Further Info



Things to do.

 

 

Walks

Friendly advice before following any of the walks on this page

Make sure you bring stout footwear and waterproof clothing incase of wet weather. Take plenty of water with you when walking, especially in hot weather, it can be hot work!

For walks from and on the farm.

To the Waterfall from camp.  Go up the road, out of camp, through the farm gate. With the large cattle shed down to your left, go through the metal kissing gate in the wall, go10 o''clock left, through a small metal gate in the stone wall, by the side of the electric pole. Now take the path to your right, this brings you onto a tarmac road amongst a small cluster of cottages, follow the road until you come to the view point on the Snowdon Mountain Railway. Takes about 10 minutes to get here, to extend the walk, carry on down the road and take the path that runs behind the coal merchants, this brings you into the base of the waterfall.

To the lake.  Llyn Cwm Dwythwch and Moel Eilio. On farm walk. Go over the stile that is at the entrance to the top field. Follow the path that runs past the white house, you will come to a sort of cross roads in the path, you need to do a sort of, left, diagonal crossover! heading for the gap in the stone wall where you will join onto a track. There may or may not be a gate at this point, depending on where the sheep are grazing. Stay on this path, shortly you will see the lake.  (This area is abundent with ancient stone circles, some are quite easy to make out.) When you go down towards  the lake there is no specific path, you are free to wander where ever you like. 40 minutes should be allowed to get here, after taking in the tranquility of the lake you may want to continue on a longer route just into the  valley (cwm) or continue up to the summit of Moel Eilio, or just  turn back home. Remember you  are able to walk any where you like in this area. If you want to walk further into the ''Cwm'', from the lake head back up towards the mountain wall, as the lower areas are wet and boggy, get back onto the track and walk into the ''cwm'',  you will come to the old sheep pens, please leave the gates as you find them.   You can  walk to the summit of Moel Eilio from here, just  follow the fence up. On your way back down, instead of going back the same way, keep following the ridge fence (NE) down, this will bring you back into sight of the campsite or if you follow the fence that goes(SE) over the ridges of Foel Gron and Foel Goch, and down onto the valley path this will bring you back to the campsite also. 

Snowdon from camp

There are 2 routes that can be walked from the site

The Llanberis Route or the Snowdon Ranger (via Bwlch Maesgwm)

For either route, follow the tarmac road up out of and past the campsite, through the farm gate. You will pass 3 houses on your way up, at the top of the road (after the 3rd house, the one with the tree house in the garden) go through the gate and turn left onto the track. Follow the track until you come to the river, there is a  concrete bridge, go through the gate, for the Ranger path keep on going, for the Llanberis route..

about 20 metres after going through the gate on the bridge, there is another gate on your left, go through this gate and walk towards the Snowdon train  station ''Hebron'' ( this is a yellow/cream colour building), on your way you will need to cross over another concrete bridge, near to a derelict cottage called Cae Newydd, there is a tree growing inside this cottage!

Keep on following the path, until you come to the derelict building, Hebron Chapel. Go through the gate and onto the tarmac road. You can either cross the railway using the stiles to cross the fences, keep on walking up towards the Llanberis path or,  follow the tarmac road down (left)going under the railway bridge and around the corner in the road to join the Llanberis, by using this route you will be on footpath all the way.

The Snowdon Ranger is an easy walk from us, not as popular as the Llanberis Route, so avoiding the crowds, the route you take from here is easy footpath all the way through the valley of ''Maesgwm''. After following the road up past the farm and crossing the river, stay on the path. You will pass several ruins which were farmsteads upto the early 1900's. This path narrows as you go through the valley and around the base of Moel Cynghorion. Then at the gate at the end of this valley, you can either go up to your left over Moel Cynghorion (known locally as Helfa Fawr) then join the Ranger route at  Bwlch Cwm Brwynog, or the easier option is to drop down towards the ranger path, following the footpath. Taking a left onto the Ranger at the junction of the footpaths.

(Both the Llanberis and the Ranger path take approx  3 hours from the campsite to the summit, then allow another 1 to 2 hours for descent)

A really good all day walk is to do the Roller coaster route which takes you up Moel Eilio, and over two smaller peaks called Foel Gron and Foel coch you can then either walk over or around Moel Cynghorion, to join onto the Ranger path, descending via the Llanberis tourist path. The views from the top of Eilio alone are well worth the walk.  

A  good way of getting to see the area is by taking the Sherpa bus, which runs frequently throughout the summer, and getting off at one of the many stops, and walking back to camp via either a route  over or around Snowdon.

Please do remember although you are in the National park, these paths are all on privately owned farmland, keep dogs on leads, leave gates as you find them, do not drop litter. Do not chase or disturb livestock or wildlife.

 

 

 

    

 

Snowdon Mountain Railway.

Since 1896, visitors from around the world have travelled on Snowdon Mountain Railway. Trains scale the highest mountain in England and Wales(1085m) where Snowdon boasts dramatic landscape and scenery. This unique railway is one of the most popular visitor attractions in North Wales. The Summit of Snowdon, at 3,560ft (1085m), is the highest mountain in England and Wales.

For more than 112 years holiday makers and day trippers have been appreciating the truly spectacular views they have experienced while claiming the ascent of Snowdon as a lifetime adventure. As the train climbs through the atmospheric landscape of Snowdon passengers can absorb themselves in the rich myth, legend and history Snowdonia has to offer.

Based on Victorian engineering Snowdon Mountain Railway is the only public rack and pinion railway in the United Kingdom and a true majestic mountain adventure.
The new £9million Summit Visitor Centre Hafod Eryri is due to open Summer 2008. On completion of this new fantastic building, Summit travel will recommence.

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This view is looking back onto Moel Eilio from Snowdon, this is a good all day route walkable straight from camp, all along the ridges. Encountering fantastic views all through, not for the faint hearted though!

 

Welsh Slate Museum

The Museum building is sited in the Victorian workshops built in the shadow of Elidir mountain, site of the vast Dinorwig quarry.

Not so much a museum as a pocket of history, it is as though the quarrymen and engineers have only just put down their tools and left the courtyard for home.

 

Welsh Slate Museum - formerly Dinorwig Quarry

 

Now, with imaginative interpretation, the remarkable relics of the slate industry can be understood and enjoyed by the many thousands of visitors to this stunning countryside on the flanks of Snowdon.

Also at the Slate Museum...

Ropes and Ladders is the new high ropes adventure centre situated in a beautiful woodland setting in the Padarn Country Park, Llanberis.

The centre provides instructor led courses around an exciting array of obstacles and challenges high up in the treetops for groups and individuals with all equipment provided.

The site is conveniently situated in the Padarn Country Park with spectacular views of the adjacent lake and surrounding mountains.

And ..

No visit to North Wales would be complete without a ride on one of the Great Little Trains of Wales. The Llanberis Lake Railway offers unrivalled views of the mountains of Snowdonia from viewpoints quite inaccessible by road, all for a modest price.

Starting at Gilfach Ddu station in the Padarn Country Park, the trip begins with a ride on the recently opened extension up to Llanberis Village, passing the Welsh Slate Museum and historic Dolbadarn Castle on the way. On a clear day magnificent views across Peris Lake to the Llanberis Pass open up. Llanberis Station is a convenient stopping off place for the shops, hotels and restaurants of the village, as well as the Snowdon Mountain Railway and Electric Mountain Visitor Centre. From here the train runs non-stop back through the Padarn Country Park and along the shore of Padarn Lake (Llyn Padarn) to the terminus at Penllyn. Due to limited access, it is advisable to stay on the train here and enjoy the views. The train makes a short stop at Cei Llydan on the homeward run. You may break your journey here for a lakeside picnic or to visit the nearby Cwm Derwen Woodland Centre and catch a later train back to Gilfach Ddu. The complete trip takes around 60 minutes if you decide to stay on the train.

Dolbadarn Castle

Dolbadarn Castle stands rather forlornly on its rocky hillock some 80 feet above Llyn Padarn, on the eastern side of the main A4086 roadway between Caernarfon and Snowdonia. Undoubtedly many tourists know about the masterful castle in Caernarfon, and may be so intent on reaching that fortress that they overlook the smaller stronghold at Dolbadarn. Yet, it is a marvelous relic, hallmarked by a proud tower built by the Welsh princes of Gwynedd, and, as such, is every bit as significant as the more massive Edwardian castles, now listed as World Heritage Sites.

 

 

 

 

WALKS TO SNOWDON AND SURROUNDING

Walks direct from

THE CAMPSITE TO SNOWDON

For either route, follow the tarmac road up out of and past the campsite, through the farm gate. You will pass 3 houses on your way up, at the top of the road (after the 3rd house, the one with the tree house in the garden) go through the gate and turn left onto the track. Follow the track until you come to the river and concrete bridge, go through the gate, for the ranger keep on going, for the Llanberis route.....

about 20 metres after going through the gate on the bridge, there is another gate on your left, go through this gate and walk towards the Snowdon train  station ''Hebron'' ( this is a yellow/cream colour building), on your way you will need to cross over another concrete bridge, near to a derelict cottage called Cae Newydd, there is a tree growing by the side of this cottage so it looks like a green roof!

Then you can either...

Keep on walking towards the station, cross over the track and cut across on the footpath to join onto the llanberis path.

Or after the second concrete bridge near the derelict cottage, take the path to your left, this will lead you onto the Llanberis path at a lower point after crossing the train track to the other side using the stiles, continue onto the tarmac road and turn right up the hill.

The Snowdon Ranger....

This is an easy walk from us,  continuing on after crossing the concrete bridge, just stay on the track, it narrows into a foot path then takes you through the valley. Not as popular as the Llanberis Route, so avoiding the crowds, the route you take from here is easy footpath all the way through the valley of ''Maesgwm'' then at the gate(at the end of this valley, you can either go over Moel Cynghorion (known locally as Helfa Fawr) then join the Ranger route at the Bwlch, or drop down towards the ranger path, following the footpath. Taking a left onto the Ranger at the junction of the footpaths. Make sure if you return via the ranger to cut back up to Bwlch Maesgwm, towards Llanberis, or you will end up in Rhyd-Ddu, the next valley.

(Both the Llanberis and the Ranger path take approx 2 and a half to 3 hours from the campsite to the summit, then allow another 1 to 2 hours for descent)

A really good all day walk is to do the Roller coaster route which takes you up Moel Eilio, and over two smaller peaks called Foel Gron and Foel coch you can then either walk over or around Moel Cynghorion, to join onto the Ranger path, descending via the Llanberis tourist path. The views from the top of Eilio alone are well worth the walk.  

A  good way of getting to see the area is by taking the Sherpa bus, which runs frequently throughout the summer, and getting off at one of the many stops, and walking back to camp via either a route  over or around Snowdon, more info on this on the to do page. 

Please do remember although you are in the National park, these paths are on privately owned farmland, keep dogs on leads, leave gates as you find them, do not drop litter. Do not chase or disturb livestock or wildlife.

 

 

Visiting > Where Can You Go?

Access

Most land in the Snowdonia National Park is privately owned and farmed. By showing respect and consideration for the countryside and wildlife and for the people who live and work in Snowdonia, you can help to make sure that the National Park will be here for future generations to enjoy.

 

Access over privately owned land is by Public Rights of Way:

 

Public footpaths

 

Bridleways

 

Permissive Paths

 

You also have a legal right of access, on foot, to land which has been mapped as Open Country and Registered Common Land.

 

These areas are shown on Ordnance Survey Explorer OL Maps. Numbers 17, 18 and 23 cover the Park on scale 1:25,000.

 

Open Countryside Logo Stiles and gates leading to Open Country are signed with the brown and white logo.

 

Leaving Open Country Logo Signifies that you are leaving Open Country. Access is on rights of way only.

 

From time to time, areas of Open Country may be closed to the public or certain conditions may be imposed. This may be to avoid danger to the public, to benefit wildlife, or to allow farmers to carry out essential work. Details of any closures or restrictions in force are available on the Countryside Council for Wales website: www.ccw.gov.uk/countrysideaccesswales.

 

Outside Open Country, please keep to rights of way. You will minimise disturbance to farmers and their livestock, wild animals, birds and plants.

 

Dogs

 

Dogs often cause injury to farm animals – particularly to sheep – in Snowdonia; causing terrible suffering to the animals, and financial loss to the farmers involved.

 

Please remember that even a normally well behaved dog can cause death and suffering, without necessarily attacking livestock. Sheep are highly susceptible to disturbance, especially when they are heavily pregnant or have just given birth, and can die as a result of being chased even a short distance. New born lambs need time to find their feed, bond with their mothers and suckle. If they are disturbed they can die. Please keep your dog under control, preferably on a lead, near sheep.

 

You have a legal duty to keep your dog under control:

 

  • On public rights of way you have a legal duty to keep your dog “under close control”.
  • On Open Country it should be on a lead (no more than 2 metres long) between 1st March and 31st July, and at all times when near livestock.

 

You are strongly advised to avoid cattle, particularly with young calves at foot, when you are accompanied by dogs. Attacks on both dogs and their owners can occur when cattle feel threatened, or even merely curious.

 

Camping

 

To camp anywhere in the National Park, you must have the permission of the landowner or the farmer. Unfenced hill land is no exception. The National Park Authority cannot give you permission; neither can they let the public have the names and addresses of landowners.

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